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A completely new computing platform is on the horizon. They're called Microservers by some, ARM Servers by others, and sometimes even ARM-based Servers. No matter what you call them, Microservers will have a huge impact on the data center and on server computing in general. What Is a Microserver...and What Isn't Although few people are familiar with Microservers today, their impact will be felt very soon. This is a new category of computing platform that is available today and is predicted to have triple-digit growth rates for some years to come - growing to over 20% of the server market by 2016 according to Oppenheimer ("Cloudy With A Chance of ARM" Oppenheimer Equity Research Industry Report). According to Chris Piedmonte, CEO of Suvola Corporation - a software and services company focused on creating preconfigured and scalable Microserver appliances for deployin... (more)

Languages for 2017 | @DevOpsSummit @AppDynamics #DevOps #JavaScript

The Most Popular Programming Languages for 2017 By Jordan Bach It’s hard to believe that it’s already 2017. But with the new year comes new challenges, new opportunities—and, of course—new software projects. One of the most important questions beginner, intermediate, and advanced coders all have to answer before they begin their next project is which programming language to use. Instead of reaching for an old favorite, pause for a moment to consider the options. There are no perfect languages, so it’s important to take the time to understand the tradeoffs. When you decide on a language, you also determine what libraries and tools you have at your disposal, the pool of candidates you can hire, the availability of documentation, and much more. In this article, we examine the top programming languages from leading industry sources to help you make an informed decision ... (more)

A Short History of Programming | @DevOpsSummit #Java #AI #ML #DevOps

Code Compiled: A Short History of Programming - Part I By Omed Habib There are more than 2,500 documented programming languages with customizations, dialects, branches, and forks that expand that number by an order of magnitude. In comparison, the Ethnologue: Languages of the World research officially recognizes 7,097 official language groups that humans use to communicate with each other all around the world. It can be hard to grasp what’s happening in the world of programming today without a solid grounding in how we got here. There are endless fascinating rabbit holes to disappear down when you look back over the past 173 years of programming. This abstract can only give you a high-level review with a strong encouragement to follow any thread that engages you. The Prehistory of Programming Ada Lovelace, daughter of the poet Lord Byron, is generally recognized as the... (more)

[session] Going #Serverless the Amazon #Lambda Way? | @CloudExpo @CAinc #AWS

Going Serverless the Amazon Lambda Way? Stay Calm and Monitor On! While some vendors scramble to create and sell you a fancy solution for monitoring your spanking new Amazon Lambdas, hear how you can do it on the cheap using just built-in Java APIs yourself. By exploiting a little-known fact that Lambdas aren't exactly single threaded, you can effectively identify hot spots in your serverless code. In his session at 20th Cloud Expo, David Martin, Principal Product Owner at CA Technologies, will give a live demonstration and code walkthrough, showing how to overcome the challenges of monitoring S3 and RDS. He will provide an overview of necessary Amazon Lambda concepts and discuss how to integrate the monitoring data with other tools. This presentation is for experienced Java coders, but does not require any familiarity with Amazon Lambdas specifically. Speaker Bio ... (more)

Revisiting Java SE 7 Features | @CloudExpo #Java #Cloud #OpenSource

Preparing for an interview? Want to just revisit Java SE 7 features? Trying to recollect or revise a Java SE programming construct? Let me take you back in time to what was introduced first in Java SE 7? Join me for this tutorial series on Java as we all eagerly await the official release of Java SE 9. Java SE 7 Release Date: 28-07-2011 Java SE 7 Code Name: Dolphin Java SE 7 Highlights Strings in switch statements. Automatic resource management in try statements. Improved type inference for generic instance creation, AKA the diamond operator <>. Simplified varargs method declaration. Binary integer literals. Allowing underscores in numeric literals. Catching multiple exception types and rethrowing exceptions with improved type checking. I have provided some of the most important core language enhancements for JDK 7.0, along with code samples. The examples provided bel... (more)

Java vs. Python: Which One Is Best for You? | @DevOpsSummit #APM #Java #Python

Java vs. Python: Which One Is Best for You? By Kevlin Henney Few questions in software development are more divisive or tribal than choice of programming language. Software developers often identify strongly with their tools of choice, freely mixing objective facts with subjective preference. The last decade, however, has seen an explosion both in the number of languages used in production and the number of languages an individual developer is likely to employ day to day. That means that language affiliations are sometimes spread more loosely and broadly across different codebases, frameworks, and platforms. Modern projects and modern developers are increasingly polyglot—able to draw on more languages and libraries than ever before. Informed choice still has a part to play. From that bustling bazaar of programming languages, let’s narrow our focus to two survivor... (more)

Intro to Object-Oriented Programming with Java

Java is an object-oriented language and Java programs consist of classes that represent objects in the real world. Classes in Java may have methods and attributes. Let's create and discuss a class named Car. This class may have one or more methods, which can tell what the objects of this class can do: start the car, stop it, accelerate, lock the doors, and so on. This class also may have some attributes or properties: color of the car, number of doors, size of engine, and so on. Our class Car may represent some common features for many different cars: all cars have such properties as color and the number of doors, and all of them perform similar actions. We can be more specific and create another Java class called ToyotaCorolla. It's still a car, but with some properties specific to the model Toyota Corolla. We will be often using such term as an object, which is an ... (more)

The Grinder: Load Testing for Everyone

The Grinder is an easy-to-use Java-based load generation and performance measurement tool that adapts to a wide range of J2EE applications. If you have a J2EE performance measurement requirement, The Grinder will probably fit the bill. Paco Gómez developed the original version of The Grinder for Professional Java 2 Enterprise Edition with BEA WebLogic Server (Wrox Press, 2000). I took ownership of the source code at the end of 2000 and began The Grinder 2 stream of development. The Grinder is freely available under a BSD-style license. This article will introduce only the basic features of The Grinder. I encourage you to download the tool and try it out. The recently published J2EE Performance Testing by Peter Zadrozny, Ted Osborne, and me (Expert Press, 2002) contains much more information about The Grinder. Where to Obtain The Grinder You can download The Grinder... (more)

Why It Makes Sense for Sun to Open-Source Java Libraries & Solaris Kernel

It makes a lot of sense for Sun to open source the Java Libraries and Solaris Kernel. It's sound business for Sun to (a) Open source license the Java J2SE,J2EE and J2ME framework libraries; and (b) Release a fork of the Solaris Kernel under the GPL license. It would benefit the entire Java based industry - including the free software, open source, and proprietary based vendors - to open license the core J2ME, J2SE, J2EE libraries and Java to bytecode compilers. Java's primary strength, the ability to write code which is constantly portable across many vendors platforms, would be greatly enhanced if all of the vendors were using the same core libraries. To insure that the standard base core would not become polluted with incompatible forks, the source could be licensed with a clause requiring any incompatible changes or any additional classes or methods to be moved t... (more)

Developer Viewpoint: (Google+Sun) > Microsoft

Whatever Google touches turns into gold. One can't necessarily say the same about Sun Microsystems, but it's a very solid company that can provide a potent foundation for Google's super-talented software engineers, visionaries and marketing force. In the end of the last century, client-server applications became un-cool. Amazon was "the man" of the Internet business. Then eBay made another revolution and has changed the lives of millions of people giving them a new way of making living right from their one-horse towns in the middle of nowhere. Sun's commitment to the slogan "The network is the computer" and its support of Java-related technologies made Java a household name which was not the case 10 years ago. What did Microsoft do during the same period? They kept making micro-improvements to the Windows OS. The year 2005 is about to end, but a majority of the en... (more)

AJAX and Mozilla XUL with JavaServer Faces

In our previous JDJ article - Rich Internet Components with JavaServer Faces - we discussed how JavaServer Faces can fulfill new presentation requirements without sacrificing application developer productivity building Rich Internet Applications (RIA). We discussed how JSF component writers can utilize technologies, such as AJAX and Mozilla XUL, to provide application developers with rich, interactive and reusable components. In order to use AJAX and Mozilla XUL with JSF, component writers have to make sure to provide any resource files need by these technologies, such as images, style sheets, or scripts. The standard approach to providing resource files for a JSF component library is to serve them directly out of the web application root file system. These resources are usually packaged in an archive (such as a ZIP file), and shipped separately from the JSF componen... (more)