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I have not blogged much about what I work with or do and that's on purpose.  Sometimes I am not allowed to tell and mostly I think you would not find it interesting.  However, I wanna share with you from Qt Developer Days #qtdd09 in Munich, which was an amazing event.

 

Not only is Qt a decent Developer tool for making desktop apps, but joining forces with Nokia, ex-Trolltech is getting far more traction as well. As a result of last week's devdays but also beta-release of Qt 4.6, one of my favorite online newsletter had this article last week.

 

But being at DevDays Europe is an amazing experience. Third year now for me and it keeps blowing my mind off.  This year an amazing 660 delegates + the 80+ Nokians that attended/helped out.

 

The DevDays often comes with some new stuff.  This year, the former Trolltech cheif engineer, Matthias Ettrich, launched QML in his keynote as the future of portable user interfaces.  An external review seems quite upbeat about QML Here is a demo

 

 

New for the year was Qt in Use that highlight what our partners and customers were doing with Qt. A few examples:

- Red Flag's incorporate of Qt SDK for their Linux Distro that has 50% of the market in China

- Commercial Open Source cases from Ogre, VideoLAN and KitWare

- TI's use of Beagle and Qt

- Pascal Lauria from Xandros reviewed how the first ever Netbook was built using Qt

- Digia showed how Qt can be used on Symbian

- etc etc.

 

Overall, it is not difficult to see that the future is bright when being at DevDays.  A hard-core techie crowd that uses, improves and helps in making Qt better. Now, with the support of Windows 7, Symbian and Maemo. And with QML, Qt Creator and a nicer IDE and later integrating cWRT, Nokia do have a winner and should be able to capatilize for the next couple of years.

 

There are of course alternatives to Qt - HTML5 (limited but still), Adobe Air, Microsoft Silverlight and not to forget, Java but I would think that Service Providers (be it fixed or wireless) should take a serious look at how to incorporate a Qt-based services/application framework for them to address any sort of device, not just mobile phones.

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More Stories By Deborah Strickland

The articles presented here are blog posts from members of our Service Provider Mobility community. Deborah Strickland is a Web and Social Media Program Manager at Cisco. Follow us on Twitter @CiscoSPMobility.